Club Music & Remixes (Playlists)

This is self-explanatory. This section if for playlists with club music, and remixes in them.

The gay club scene - SpotifyThrowbacks.com

Gay life, house music, club music, rare classics, 12 inches, vinyl, records, rare music, gay classics

Song: Various

Artist: Various

Album: Playlist

Genre: Club Music & Remixes

I’ve been meaning to do this for a very long, long time 🙄!  As I’ve said before, just as straight people have history, so does the LGBT community. We have a history that is unique to us as LGBT people. In addition, LGBT/SGL Black American and Boriqua/Hispanic American have our own unique sub-history within LGBT history. And like the straight community, we have huge generation gaps within our gay history. Learning about gay history is just as important as any other history, especially when it comes to Black and Hispanic gay culture. We are presented with our own unique challenges, and our ability to try and convey our stories largely depends on the gay generation you come from. It is unfortunate that it appears that there are more young LGBT people in politics, that aren’t connected to any part of gay history. This should not be, as understanding our journey gives you a deeper understanding and perspective of our diverse realities. Not only that, I’ve seen str8 hip hop videos where the dudes where actually vogueing. But because it’s hip hop, and you’re supposed to be “gangster,” it’s not seen as anything… No one bats an eye… Meanwhile, my gay brothers and sisters where beat-up and chased for our uniqueness back in the day, and straight people are allowed to steal and recycle something that’s been created by us, and been in our community for decades. Know your gay history MF. LEARN!! It’s important.

LGBT People Have Our Own Unique Music History!





I can honestly say that for most of us, the music we listened to literally kept many of us alive, both in our mind and spirit. The club scene allowed us to escape from our deepest emotional pain; as well as escape from abusive relationships. The pressures put on LGBT people to be straight was immense. I don’t think I could find the words to even begin to explain to a straight person what that’s like, and the damage they’ve caused for many LGBT people. When I was growing up, for many straight people, having a Walkman and headphones was simply optional. However, for most gay people in the poorer communities, owning a Walkman or CD player was a necessity. It was the only effective tool we had to use that helped to block out negativity and devastatingly hurtful words.

Most Music Played In Gay Clubs Were Str8!





I’m not sure if there was a reason for this, or perhaps it just happen to be the way it was back in the day, but…. You’d think in the clubs we’d hear our own music made by gay artists. However, for whatever reason, there just wasn’t that many. And when I came out, RuPaul hadn’t emerged yet. Actually, there was only one prominent gay performer producing his own recordings. That was performer’s name was Kevin Aviance. The best way to describe Keven was, he was almost like a male version of Grace Jones 🤣. Unfortunately, I only liked one song he produced, and that was a song a called “Cunty (1999).” Yeah, I know, some of you may take issue with the title song; however, this was what the gay culture was back then. For many LGBT people, embracing words that would normally be considered inappropriate, were used to take back our lost power in defiance. The power that was lost due to living in a predominantly oppressive hetero society. I love this song because it had a fierce vogue-able dance beat in it’s background.

Back Then, In The Black/Hispanic Gay Club Scene, Our Music Was Very Much Underground For The Most Part!





Kevin Aviance, gay culture, SpotifyThrowback, gay history

One reality that wasn’t talked about in regards to underground music; gay clubs played a significant role as to whether or not an underground song/beat would be successful or not. Also, let me just say that, back then, I think it’s safe to say that if a song/beat was not vogue-able, it would be a guaranteed flop! I knew so many people who refused to go to certain clubs if the music played were not vogue-able (hissy-fit and all). It is also interesting that a lot of underground str8 music played in gay clubs, were usually not heard in str8 clubs unless the song went mainstream. It is also true that a lot of good Latin club music would not be heard in a predominantly gay Black establishments either. This not only baffled me, it frustrated me too. This was an era where both Black and Hispanics done the most music collaborations. I couldn’t for the life of me understand why in this aspect, we appeared to be separated. Unfortunately, if we wanted to hear Latin club music in the 80s, we needed to go to specific places, such as an establishment called “Escuelita.” Escuelita has been closed for about 5-6 years now I think. To be honest, I hated that club, because if I remember correctly, they functioned like a lot of the str8 clubs did. That being, they used to pick and choose who gets to enter in the club. I’ve been in too many situations where many of them that operate like that, didn’t live up to the hype (once you finally get in).

Some Of The Biggest Club Mixes Where Dirty As F***!





So, this is the largest playlist I ever made for pubic consumption. It has a whopping 101 major gay anthems I could remember growing up in the gay clubs. This isn’t even all of them. I may consider doin’ a part 2 in the future, I’ll think about it 🤣, I darn near popped a brain cell trying to remember all these greats! One of my many most memorable favorites was, “Break 4 Love.” You know, it was funny, although this was one of my most favorite club mixes, I was frightened to play this around family back then. For me, I felt it was way too raunchy, and was not appropriate to play for family. At times I kind of felt embarrassed. However, when I started hearing it played on the radio, I was like, f** it, I’m gonna play it too. LOLOL

Today, EDM Appears To Be The Replacement Genre For What Was Once The Greatest Club Music Of My Time!





A club called "The Garage," or "Club Paradise."

Another dirty song I used to like a lot was a song by a performer named, Sweet P**** Pauline.” She had a song out called “Work This P****.” Unfortunately, this was one of those songs that was so popular, there were like a million remixes for it. It seems that Spotify doesn’t have the original (or at least the most popular one I remembered), but, I think the one I found on YouTube is ok, because it contains full lyrics. This song was hilarious!!!! Other favorites on this list is “I Can’t Get Enough,” by Liz Torres; “Work That Muth*****,” by Steve Poindexter; “The Party,” by Kraze; “Magic Carpet Ride,” by Mighty Dub Katz. We also vogued to a lot of traditional classic oldies, such as Diana Ross’s “The Boss,” and many music by Salsoul Orchestra. I hope you enjoy your trip through memory lane.

Ok, guys, I decided to give you a treat this weekend. I put together a hand picked playlist (by yours truly as always) of 20 of what I consider some of the BEST Latino club mixes of the 80s and 90s! This playlist will not only make you go down memory lane, it will make you sweat by the time you finish playing it. Like many other types of music, I am saddened that we don’t hear this kind of music anymore. It’s as tho all Latin dance music was replaced with either EDM or Reggaeton. I guess Boricua club music follows the same path that disco did, a once thriving genre now considered defunct by the younger Latino generation.

SpotifyThrowbacks.com

You many not care about that, but I see it as a huge problem. Because 80s Latin club music was listened to by everyone. It didn’t matter if it was in English or Spanish. I don’t give a sh*t what you think, when I was growing up, if you really wanted to party hard, we’d go to a Latin club. Also, the kinds of people Latin music attracted was different. It was very rare I heard fights, gun fire, or any of that sh*t in a Latin club. When people came to Latin clubs, people moved every inch of their bodies, and perhaps forget about their stresses for the night, and just let go. Today, it seems the only thing people interested in doin’ is reggaeton, and twerking their ass region until their ass claps. Sorry…. Let me get off my soap box.

SpotifyThrowbacks.com

The songs in this playlist has been either produced by Latinos, or Latinos strongly had influence! So, what’s in this playlist? How about “Sume Sigh Sey” by Todd Terry. Or How about “Funkete” by The General. I’ll give you one more. How about personal huge favorite “You & You & You (Mambo Mix).” I don’t know what it is, Latin musicians have a way of taking strange and unusual sounds that people don’t hear every day, and turning it in to a club hit. Listen to my full playlist on Spotify. Enjoy!

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